andatsea:

Some process gifs as an overview of my general approach when it comes to painting. I have made other posts about my process before (which you can access through the #answers tag) but it does seem to be a popular thing to ask about, so here’s another one-size-fits-all kind of answer.

For environments I follow a very loose sketch and move right into blocking out main shapes and overall colour scheme. For things that may require more detail due to proximity (e.g. faces) I will do cleaner lines.

It can be fun to paint messily (see the maidenhair drawing) but in many cases you may want to adopt habits which will speed up your process such as locking down transparency (or use layer masks or both) for things which need it so you won’t be wasting time cleaning up edges later. Natural shapes are more forgiving of lines which are out of perspective; don’t be afraid to use things like polygonal lasso or shapes when drawing buildings. Use large brushes when building up colour scheme; the whole thing will read better without unplanned strokes everywhere.

Sometimes I get comments about detail. My paintings aren’t usually very detailed. I like to draw things from far away, and the further away something is the easier it is to draw. Shapes can be implied. There is no need to draw every petal of a flower or ever branch of a tree or every blade of grass. A few blades of grass can hint at a whole lawn.

For brushes I primarily like to use Photoshop’s default hard/soft circle brushes, occasionally flattened to an oval. The default chalk series is also good. I also often make custom brushes for paintings, especially for different types of foliage. When making or using brushes pay attention to brush settings like Scattering, Brush Tip Shape > Spacing, and Shape Dynamics > Angle Jitter. There is no magical brush which will solve all your painting problems. There are brushes which are better suited for some purposes than others (e.g. a general leaf shape with scattering and angle jitter). Learn how to fish.

After all your fundamentals are there the painting process is really just a matter of defining and rendering until you feel like it’s time to stop. This is the easiest part, although depending on how defined you want your painting to be it can also be the most time consuming.

That’s all for now. :)

(via ladyzolstice)

How do you know which color is best for the lights and which one is for the shadows depending on the tones of the skin ? I'm an artist too and i always have a hard time trying to figure out which color i should use. (Btw, your art is AMAZING !!!)

Anonymous

euclase:

The best way to tell you is to show you, so here is my friend the former General Obi-Wan Kenobi to help:

image

Skin color (pretty much any human skin color in almost any ordinary lighting) is

  • lower saturation yellow at its brightest
  • higher saturation orange/red in the middle
  • lower saturation brown/gray at its darkest

That’s really it?

Skin gets pinker and redder where there are more blood vessels closer to the surface (lips, ears, nostrils, eyelids) and grayer and bluer where there are less, like your jaw.

But even if the person has very dark skin, and they’re standing in some blue light, it’s still pretty likely you’re going to find the same pattern of [low sat, high sat, low sat] or [yellow, orange, gray].

If you’re drawing by observation, and you get stuck, it’s a way to check yourself.

I hope this helps. D:

beastofthewest:

Some hand references.

Sources 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Redid a post by fucktonofanatomyreferencesreborn with sources because they never source anything and I don’t want to reblog that post because I don’t want to support blogs who don’t give credit to people

(No, stating that the art is ~not yours~ and ~came from elsewhere~ IS NOT PROPER CREDIT. Many of these have usernames and such on them but not every single one and you still ought to link back to the specific piece)

I couldn’t source the last one so I didn’t include it.

(via marshyoftheblobs)

Adobe Kuler (Explore) Adobe Kuler (Create) Chromaa Color Scheme Designer Color Collective Color Palette Generator Just Jaimee Daily Color Inspiration Color Hunter Design Seeds Colllor

pscs5:

forbiddenforest:

COLOR PALETTE MASTERPOST by forbiddenforest

So today I felt like sharing some useful websites that provide pre-made color palettes (left side), as well as sites that allow you to create custom ones (right side). They can be used for graphic design, themes, art, interior design, or just something pretty to look at.

Adobe Kuler (Explore)

Chromaa

Color-Collective

Just Jaimee Daily Color Inspiration

Design Seeds

Adobe Kuler (Create)

Color Scheme Designer

Color Palette Generator (paste the URL of an image and it will automatically generate a pallet that matches the image)

Color Hunter (upload an image and it will automatically generate a pallet that matches the image)

Colllor

I hope you find this useful (and please like or reblog if you did)! Enjoy :)

(via virtualcarrot)

10 typical perspective errors

electricalice:

Drawing perspective is considered one of the hardest things in art, except the mistakes usually done are pretty much always the same and can be avoided with a little care.

1. Lines not reaching the vanishing point

image

Well this is pretty simple to avoid but it’s the most common mistake. It’s probably due to either carelessness or really not having understood the basic of perspective. I encourage you to go back and find some basic tutorial for this.

Anyway, be ALWAYS careful about where to ‘send’ your lines, they NEED to go towards the correct vanishing point or it will just look awkward. Double check if necessary.

And always, ALWAYS use a ruler.

If your style requires lines that are a bit less geometrical (as mine do, I have a style of inking that’s sketchy so ‘perfect’ lines drawn with a ruler usually don’t fit well in the picture) use a ruler anyway for the pencils and then ink later by freehand. At least you’ll have correct guidelines underneath.

image

For traditional drawing be sure you have a ruler and be sure to use it for each one of your lines.

Modern drawing software will help you a lot with this if you draw directly on computer: painting software such as Clip Studio Paint or Manga Studio 4EX or 5 have perspective tools that will automatically snap your lines towards the vanishing point.

image

it’s quite a long tutorial, you’ll find the rest under the Read More or you can download the pdf file here

Read More

(via ladyzolstice)